Reflection on a Quote

REFLECTION 1

Introduction of the Chosen Quote

I selected a quote in the article that argues that, “some thingscannot be bought using money in a civilized society (Sandel 2012,P.14).” The quote is meant to create an opposition to a surrogacycontract discussed in the article, which involves women giving birthto children and relinquishing them. I think that the quote isapplicable because some things such as a baby are unethical andshould not be given monetary value.

Elaboration

The issue explored in the quote is that the value of money islimited. A contract that involves selling of babies is not moralbecause money cannot compensate the value of a child. I see itunrealistic to exchange a child for money. I think that people shouldnot grant themselves the freedom to calculate the monetary value ofsome goods. The idea of focus is that children should not be termedas commodities (Sandel, 2012). I consider treating children as goodsor commodities to be degrading.

Justification

I picked the quote from the article because it covers unethicalpractice. The contract of selling children in the paper drew myattention (Sandel, 2012). I agree with the argument depicted in thequote since money has value but the value of a child is infinite.Moreover, money can be made easily but bearing a child is achallenging task.

Interpretation

The quote is related to the overall theme of the article because itdiscusses an issue that is focuses on the moral context of markets(Sandel, 2012). The argument of the quote that money cannotcompensate the value of all things emphasizes the ethical aspect ofmarkets.

Contextualization

Society and business issue that targets the ethical feature ofmarkets is focused in the quote. The overall argument claims thatmoney should not be highly valued and some things do not fit to becategorized as commodities (Sandel, 2012). According to the quote,things such as children should not be given monetary value because itis unethical.

Reference

Sandel, M. J. (2012). What money can`t buy the moral limits ofmarkets. Macmillan.